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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My friend's parents just bought him a system for his birthday. It is an A Series Xtant 12" Subwoofer in a Slot-ported box with the Xtant 1.1 Amplifier.

From what I have read the Amplifier is of excellent quality and an Audiophile grade Amplifier.

My concern is that it won't be powerful enough for the subwoofer, the sub is rated at 250 watts RMS and the amplifier is 100 watts RMS.

What do you think??
 
G

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There's nothing to worry about. It's fine.

Just because a subwoofer might have a maxium rating of 1500 watts doesn't mean you are doing something wrong by only powering it with 100 watts.

What most people keep forgetting is that the power you put into the subwoofer SHOULD be lower than the rated thermal power limit of the subwoofer if you are using a sealed enclosure towards the large side of the recommended volume or if your port is tuned too close to the resonant frequency of the subwoofer.
 

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well there is no worries, just try it out
but you wont get the full potential of the sub, if the sub doesnt hit hard then you know you need more power
then it should sound much better

i like amps to have more power then the subs its trying to push
so the amps doesnt have to work as hard
therefore less chances of overheating or such unless it has those build in fan like mine - audiobahn
 
G

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cougarkat -- if you have a 1,000 watt amplifier but you're only running it at 1/3 volume, that amplifier will only be putting out ~333 watts to the subwoofer. The problem with that is the amplifier is only running at ~50% efficiency. That means your amplifier is still pulling ~50 amperes of current and trying to dissipate 333 watts of heat (the other 50% of that efficiency equation). If you have a 400 watt amplifier and you're running it at full volume, the power output will be ~400 watts, while the amplifier is running at anywhere from ~75% to ~80% efficiency. We'll stick with 75% to make the numbers easier. That means this smaller amplifier is pulling ~40 amperes of current and trying to dissipate ~100 watts of heat (the other 25% of this efficiency equation).

What does this mean in the bottom line? Amplifier overheating has less to do with how hard you are driving the amplifier and much more to do with the design of the amplifier circuit board and the amplifier heatsink. Additionally, some amplifiers are affected more by heat than others. The really old (7-10 years ago) Rockford Fosgate amplifiers ran VERY hot all the time. That's just how they were, but they wouldn't suffer a melt down unless you installed them under a seat or something.
 
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