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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want o paint the calipers on my car but i don't know what a good accent color would be. the color is melina blue it looks purple until you wax the crap out of it and the sun hits it just right so i don't know what would be a good color to make my calipers. anyone have any ideas???
 

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El Mucho Post Whoro
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12,140 Posts
I would think white would get dirty really fast though with all that brake dust there... yellow sounds cool for a Melina blue though. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
from what ive heard there is two ways to do it youcn either buy caliper paint that is brushed on or you can take you chances with spray paint and theen use a clear coat i havent done it yet but im looking into it so if anyon else knows the betterway to go it would be apreciated
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's how I did mine (and I apologize in advance if this is long or rambling, but it was a few months ago)... Oh, and my car is Zinc Yellow and I bought VHT brand yellow "hi-temp" paint and it's a damn near perfect match...lucky me, I guess! ANYway --

The first thing you're gonna want to do is (obviously) pick out the color. With a Melina Blue, it'll be very tough to find a perfect match given what's out there in terms of hi-temp paints. Keep in mind that the lighter color you pick, the easier it will be to show dirt. Go to your local PepBoys (or the like) and check out their spray can section. Any paint that says "hi temp" or "engine paint" will work for your calipers. Some paints are rated up to 900 degrees, others around 500, but I believe either should work. You should need no more than 2 cans. Just keep in mind that once this stuff goes on, it's very doubtful it will ever come off. You're also going to want to buy some brake parts cleaner and a wire brush (I got Valvoline and it worked really well).

When you get home, try to do this on a non-windy day. Either that, or pull it in your garage and leave the door open to vent the fumes - the windier it is, the more of a p.i.t.a this is going to be...trust me. Anyway, find some plastic bags like the kind you get from the grocery store (at least 8) and, only if you want, some newspaper and tape to mask off the area in and around your wheel well. Again, you do NOT want this paint getting on your body paint. You can get as crazy about masking stuff off as you want - it's your choice. Oh, and don't paint your calipers if you've just been out driving around. Make sure they're nice and cool... Starting in the morning is the best way to go.

Jack the car up and (as always!) use a jack stand to support it. Take the lugs off and remove the tire. Spray your caliper with the brake parts cleaner (really soak it) and just scrub the living $h!t out of it with the brush. The more clean the caliper is to begin with, the easier it will be. Maybe hit it again with the cleaner and give it another scrub. Once you've made sure that the caliper is as clean and dry as you can get it, you can begin painting. This is where those grocery bags come in to play. I used 2 per caliper. They work really well because 1)they're free, and 2)they're extremely easy to put on and take off. You're going to want to put one bag over the entire rotor and "tuck" it underneath the caliper to the best of your ability. Don't want paint on the rotors. You can use the second bag to wrap around/cover the parts behind the rotor so you don't get overspray on them as well. Take a minute to check everything over really well and ensure that you're not gonna paint something you don't want to.

When it comes time to spray, use many (and I stress many) LIGHT coats of paint. Spray each coat on and allow time to dry in between coats. Plan on making a day out of this project, or at least several hours. You want to do a really good job - after all, it's permanent! Mine took about 4-5 coats before they looked really good. I believe there is a hi-temp clearcoat out there as well that will give the calipers a nice shine, so that will add a little more time. Personally, I don't know if it's worth the time to do because these are brakes - they get REALLY dirty. Once the calipers are dry to the touch, you can take the bags off (toss 'em), put the tire back on, let the car down, and go on to the other 3! Not that difficult...the more careful you are, the better it will turn out.

Just remember that you really "shouldn't" drive the car for 24 hrs. or so after you finish painting - give the stuff time to fully cure - so don't make any plans that night to show off your newly painted calipers.

As for the brush on stuff, the guys around here in the "performance" shops really push the stuff over the spray cans. The brush on stuff runs about 40 bucks for the kit, and most places will charge 80-100 to put it on for you (about 2 hrs. labor). I enquired about doing it myself, but it's a 2-part mixture that, once you mix together, it starts to harden. What that translates into is you having to have all 4 tires off your car at once to get it done. Unless you've got a 4 post jack at your house, or know somebody who owns a garage, that stuff is useless to a do-it-yourselfer. Plus, the hi-temp stuff in the cans "sticks" just as well in my opinion. It's gonna get dirty no matter what kind it is, so you might as well save yourself the money. Additionally, you can go back and paint 'em again a few months down the road with the spray stuff - not possible with the brush-on kind. SO!...unless you have to go out and buy the jack, jackstands, lug wrench, Plus the paint supplies, this mod will cost you under 20 bucks -- 1/5 of what a shop would charge you for the other kind...

Sorry for the long explanation - just trying to remember it all! If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask or email me - [email protected]. Best of luck, and happy modding!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the detailed info syracoog. One of these days I'm going to have to get around to painting mine, too. I'm going to print off your post for future reference :)
 
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