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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just looking for a detailed how to on buffing recently painted parts. for example.. i paint a hoodscoop or something.. but i know it needs to be buffed or whatever.. so the question is how do i do it? what compound should i use? (i know they come with abraisives (sp?) but what brand? a buffer? what type of surface should the buffer have? a regular cotton bonnet?

any help is help. thanks
 

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There are waxes and buffing compounds that are made specifically to be used with an electric buffer, just go to Pep Boys or someplace like that. I wouldn't use anything abrasive like a rubbing compound unless you're trying to remove a scratch because then you have to wax all the scratches that the compound makes out. There are also buffing bonnets made for car buffing, but I think they are just the regular cotton bonnets anyway.
 

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What kind of imperfections are you seeing? If you have a lot of orange peel or wavyness, you may need to wetsand a little to smooth those out before buffing.

Unless you plan on doing a lot of buffing, I suggest just taking the piece to a body shop and paying them a little to do it. Otherwise you'll be spending at least $300 on materials to do it yourself. A good high speed buffer is around $200 (Makita, Dewalt, most power tool companies make them), plus you'll need a foam polishing pad, 3M Perfect It Rubbing Compound, 3M Machine Glaze, microfiber cloths, and possibly some 1500 - 2000 grit sandpaper. 3M's compounds and glazes use a chemical cutting action, not abrasive.

Plus you shouldn't really try to undertake this unless you have someone experienced to help you get down the basics, otherwise you may do more harm than good. There may be a how-to on this in the car care section under scratch removal or something, but if you can't find one and are going to be investing the proper materials to do this, let me know and I'll try to throw a quick tutorial together for you.

edit: spelling
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Originally posted by: Morph
What kind of imperfections are you seeing? If you have a lot of orange peel or wavyness, you may need to wetsand a little to smooth those out before buffing.

Unless you plan on doing a lot of buffing, I suggest just taking the piece to a body shop and paying them a little to do it. Otherwise you'll be spending at least $300 on materials to do it yourself. A good high speed buffer is around $200 (Makita, Dewalt, most power tool companies make them), plus you'll need a foam polishing pad, 3M Perfect It Rubbing Compound, 3M Machine Glaze, microfiber cloths, and possibly some 1500 - 2000 grit sandpaper. 3M's compounds and glazes use a chemical cutting action, not abrasive.

Plus you shouldn't really try to undertake this unless you have someone experienced to help you get down the basics, otherwise you may do more harm than good. There may be a how-to on this in the car care section under scratch removal or something, but if you can't find one and are going to be investing the proper materials to do this, let me know and I'll try to throw a quick tutorial together for you.

edit: spelling

thanks morph. much appreciated.
 
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Can't you just kid of use rubbing compund and a good buffer?? Kind of what you said above but a simpler approach. Maybe he doesn't have to go through all of that if the problem is minor
 

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You're right, its hard to know exactly what he would need without seeing the parts. Like I said, I think the safest bet would be to just pay a body shop because they can properly assess the situation better. Regarding the wetsanding, I stated it may be necessary if there are a lot of waves or orange peel. And, when buffing, you should always follow up with some glaze after using rubbing compound to minimize swirl marks.
 
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