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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Ford was tight-lipped on specifics, but told us the motor will produce 281 hp (210 kW / 285 PS) and 318 lb-ft (431 Nm) of torque. Those are decent figures and Ford’s Chief Product Platform and Operations Officer, Hau Thai-Tang, noted the output is higher than what was available on the Fox body Mustang.

Furthermore, CAD files released by Ford Performance show the electric motor is 22.5 inches (570 mm) long, making it significantly smaller than Ford’s traditional crate engines. That being said, it will need to be accompanied by a battery pack.
Getting it into a Cougar would be a pain, custom made half shafts, or custom made rear subframe and suspension plus cutting out the body...

Looking at the pictures and specs it's pretty much the rear motor from the Mustang Mach E California Edition (290 hp / 317 lb-ft) tuned down by a few HP, which itself is probably the same as the one from the Mach E Select tuned up 24 hp. The Select in RWD configuration is probably around 2100 kg or 4600 lb has respectable 5.8s 0-60 time, throw one in one of our cars weighing substantially less and you'll have a real beast.

As far as batteries go, GM's been teasing a "Electric Crate Motor" which is basically a Chevy Bolt motor and battery pack you can bolt into the bed of an old truck, but this will require a custom made battery solution probably, unless Ford comes out with a modular battery pack and battery management system and charger. The Mach E battery pack doesn't lend itself to being installed modularly like this motor, but that's not to say that their supplier couldn't do so. The Mach E runs on a 356v, 68kWh battery pack, definitely something ANYBODY should take lightly, that's enough power supply the average midwestern home for 4.5 hours, it'll kill you in a hurry if you're not careful. The Mach E battery is also well over 1000lbs, so overall if you wanted to keep the weight similar to stock (say about 3000lbs total) you'd have to build up a pack that's 178v, 34kWh, or a higher voltage lower Ah. So you'd have about half the battery in a vehicle a bit more than half the weight, for probably around 150-200 miles of range.

Of course, the price tag isn't going to be cheap, GM's Bolt derived platform is around $20k-$30k, they haven't commited to an exact number I can find. And you know Ford isn't going to be that far behind
 

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It's the beginning. Maybe not a Mr. Fusion yet. Some battery manufacturer is going to start putting together modules for DIY. Keep your Cougar body rust free! ;)

And that name.. ha ha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Almost feel like Ron had something to do with that name.

Actually, you could pair this with a hydrogen fuel cell, but that requires access to a hydrogen refueling network, which is even more of a pipe dream than an infrastructure capable of handling charging 200 million EV's. But that would be even closer to the Mr. Fusion.

Give it 40 years though, and you'll basically have to do EV conversions to keep old cars on the road, as gas gets phased out, that or diesel as I don't think that ICE is going anywhere in the long haul trucking industry any time soon, and thus we won't see prices on diesel rise to $20-$30 per gallon.

Actually, given some of the info I'm aware of about the nuclear industry and micro reactors, we could see nuclear powered trucks before the end of the century. It'll probably be a gas cooled pebble bed reactor system using TRISO fuel of some sort, only require refueling every decade or so. Problem would be hot starts, what with xenon poisoning being a problem in all reactors running on uranium. Big problem would be the same as the nuclear industry has been facing since the 70's, the petroleum industry paying lobbyist and activist groups to demonize the scary "nUcLeAr BoMbS cRiSsCrOsSiNg ThE cOuNtRy!"
 

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I don't see fission powered trucks ever taking over, although that would be an elegant solution for mobile Hydrogen generators.
Small modular reactors could potentially support a more robust and localized power grid but there are a lot of obstacles to that reality.
A really cool technology that is totally within reach that could seriously transform truck efficiency would be magnetic bearings. Eliminating friction might make battery powered trucks feasible. Trains too. Hell, trains could carry their own H2 generators if we cared enough...we could have water powered choo-choos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A hydrogen fuel cell actually works, vehicle mounted H2 "generators" are snake oil, though maybe MMC was confusing the two? IDK. But I've seen too many snake oil salesmen try to sell me on hydrogen generators that "make power from water" by magically generating H2 from water then burning it to produce energy with the only byproduct being, you guessed it, water.

Hydrogen Fuel Cells otoh require a grid tied hydrogen generating system that consumes power and stores it as H2, which can then fuel HFC vehicles, basically making them a different type of battery.
 

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Getting it into a Cougar would be a pain, custom made half shafts, or custom made rear subframe and suspension plus cutting out the body...
Rich Rebuilds on YouTube put a very similar form factor electric motor into an R53 MINI Cooper S a few months ago; made it look very easy. Just re-used the manual trans from the Cooper with an adapter plate and sent it. Same half-shafts, same subframe, no cutting.
 

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Hydrogen Fuel Cells otoh require a grid tied hydrogen generating system that consumes power and stores it as H2, which can then fuel HFC vehicles, basically making them a different type of battery.
I think I was on too much caffeine that day and failed to engage my common sense drive, and ended up mixing ideas together.
Let me try again:
1. Mag bearings should be a thing.
2. Fuel cells on trains could be a thing.
3. A H2 supply network for the trains could be a thing much more easily than a H2 network for the roads.
4. Small, modular reactor plants could be used to power H2 generator stations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
H2 works for trains, yeah, even better powered by SMR's, or solar arrays. MNR's powering a train makes a lot of sense too though, as you just don't need to stop. Pull up to a stop? Just plug into the grid and generate to the grid to prevent having to cool down the reactor and dealing with Xenon poisoning.


Rich Rebuilds on YouTube put a very similar form factor electric motor into an R53 MINI Cooper S a few months ago; made it look very easy. Just re-used the manual trans from the Cooper with an adapter plate and sent it. Same half-shafts, same subframe, no cutting.
Eh, the Mini had an electric traction motor installed IIRC. This is a full electric axle with single speed gearbox, differential, and parking pawl. Reusing an ICE gearbox is pretty inefficient since you don't need the extra gears or a clutch, so that's just weight you can save for more batteries.
 
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